Miracles Happen

by Dana Taylor

“Miracle”–an effect or extraordinary event in the physical world that surpasses all known human or natural powers and is ascribed to a supernatural cause; such an effect or event manifesting or considered as a work of God.

“For those who believe, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe, no explanation is possible.” from The Song of Bernadette by Franz Werfel

Since 2005 I’ve been puzzling the mystery of miraculous healings, when one of my closest friends, Paula, overcame an “incurable” disease, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), via two Reiki treatments. It took us many months to accept her healing had truly taken place. Eventually the word “miracle” was bandied about.  (Read either of my Supernal Series books to get the full story.) Was it truly a miracle? Something beyond human ability to replicate?  What if we had stumbled upon a valid, alternative approach to health and wellness? What if we were simply ignorant of the principles behind what we deemed a “miracle”? Perhaps we were like 17th century humans who have considered electricity, air travel, and antibiotics “miracles.” I’ve been studying “miracles” ever since.

So, of course, I couldn’t resist a book entitled Miracles from Heaven: A Little Girl, Her Journey to Heaven, and Her Amazing Story of Healing in the bargain books on a recent visit to Barnes and Noble. Written by Texas resident, Christy Wilson Beam, Miracles from Heaven, relates the difficult and inspiring story of Christy Beam’s daughter, Annabel. As the subtitle reveals, Annabel had been a chronically ill little girl for most of her life when she took a head first thirty-foot fall into the center of a hollowed-out cottonwood tree. While her parents, sisters, neighbors and emergency crews worked on rescuing her, she was transported to another dimension and sat on the lap of Jesus.

Christy Beam and her editors do a deft job of weaving the day of the fall and trauma with the back story of Anna’s debilitating illness. Christy and Kevin Beam live in the “silver buckle of the Bible Belt” in Burleson, Texas. Kevin is a veterinarian, Christy a stay-at-home mom with three daughters, Abbie, Annabel, and Adelynn. They were the perfect Baptist poster family until Annabel was struck with a disorder that prevented her from digesting food. Their journey through emergencies, surgeries, specialists, and vigilant monitoring is revealed, but not belabored. The resilience of little Annabel is inspiring, as is the unity of the Christian family that strives for joy and gratitude in all circumstances.

I don’t think it’s a spoiler to tell you Annabel not only survived the fall,  but that she emerged completely healed of her illness. The book is written well enough with engaging personalities that knowing the happy ending is coming doesn’t take away from the reading experience.

This healing is reminiscent of Anita Moorjani’s book, Dying to Be Me. (See The Gift of Cancer.) Both books relate near-death experiences followed by complete healings of chronic conditions. These things happen. They fall far outside modern medical models. Double blind studies are impossible. They can’t be replicated by drugs, surgeries, or protocols.

Yet, there are lessons to be learned. Simply being opened to the possibility of improvement may be a first step. The Beam family maintained a deep, abiding Christian faith that got them through the toughest of times. After seven years of dealing with RSD, my friend, Paula, had been told by her doctors that her options were finished. She should go home, get her affairs in order, and prepare to deteriorate and die. When I suggested a visit to Oklahoma and a few Reiki treatments, she could have rejected the idea in resignation and despair. Instead, she reached out to a branch of hope. She didn’t expect a healing, but perhaps some relief from pain. Instead, she received the “miracle.”

One thing receivers of miracles seem to have in common–they reach out to others with compassion and generosity of spirit. Annabel is noted for her kindness and hopes to work with chronically ill children. Anita Moorjani travels the world speaking on spirituality and self-acceptance. Paula is always helping others less fortunate than herself.

Miracles have a ripple effect. At this point, I can only say, be open to “miracles” and when they happen, don’t ignore them. Miracles are a second chance at getting life right. Live with joy, gratitude and compassionate action. Maybe we can all become miracle workers.

Bright Blessings,

Dana Taylor

Don’t miss the Supernal Series Books!

 

 

One comment on “Miracles Happen

  1. Love this! Seems we humans tire of everything, including miracles or even the notion of them. We are the classic eagles raised by chickens who peck the ground instead of soaring in the freedom of our natural flight. We look down for every solution, or outside of ourselves instead of within. Creating miracles is complex and tricky, but receiving them is even trickier. Although the possibility of physical miracles surrounds us always (the fundamental manipulation of light at the quantum level), it is we who are too: insecure, tired, bored, jaded, disinterested or faithless to conjure or receive them. Thanks so much for reminding us of their presence. xo

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