Erasing Reincarnation from the Christian Mind

Book Cover Reveals: Coming soon–a new look and a new book

Streams                   Adventures

Back in 2010, Ever-Flowing Streams: Christ, Reiki, Reincarnation and me was the original title of the book currently called Ever-Flowing Streams: Tapping into Healing Energy. While I felt the first title more accurately captured the spirit of the book, I changed it in deference to my husband (now deceased) who considered “Christ” and “Reincarnation” associated together an insult to his faith. In the ensuing years, the greatest feedback I’ve received about the book has been from people in the Christian church thanking me for giving them “permission” to maintain a faith in Jesus and yet embrace a philosophy of reincarnation.

Since I’m on the brink of releasing a companion book, Supernal Adventures, I feel it’s time to repackage Ever-Flowing Streams and restore the original title. There’s a whole chapter devoted to the controversy regarding reincarnation. Here is a snippet, revealing some history. As it turns out, many early church theologians and followers believed reincarnation to be the way of the human experience.

Excerpt from Ever-Flowing Streams:

“Born Again?

Great minds and mystics have grappled with the theory of reincarnation for eons. The modern Christian church dismisses the concept. The party line is that we are born once; we have the option of accepting Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior for our ticket to heaven; if we don’t, we are condemned to hell. This interpretation of scripture promotes church membership quite effectively.

But looking historically and globally, I found that reincarnation has been embraced by cultures far and wide. Even the Bible retains passages that allude to it. Besides the reference above from Matthew naming John the Baptist and Elijah as the same soul, Jesus seemed to convey the concept in several references:

John 8:58–Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.

Luke 9:18-20–“Who do the people say that I am?” And they answered, “John the Baptist; but others say Elijah; and others, that one of the old prophets has risen.”

John 9:2—As he went along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”

If you take the above passages at face value, it appears there was a cultural acceptance of the idea that souls return to the earthly plane. Clearly, the people of the time exhibited a belief in reincarnation if they conjectured Jesus might be the returning spirits of Elijah or an Old Testament prophet.

Theologians have argued these passages for two thousand years. One of the earliest and most respected was Origen of Alexandria who lived from 185-254 A.D. According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, he believed in the “pre-existence and fall of souls; multiple ages and transmigration of souls; and the eventual restoration of all souls to a state of dynamic perfection in proximity to the godhead.” Quite the metaphysician, Origen. He devoted his life to teaching and writing his Christian beliefs until the Roman Emperor of the day ordered a purging of the followers of Christ. Origen was martyred in Tyre. 

The debate continued for another two hundred years until the church grew into a political institution. According to Life Between Life by Joel L. Whitton, Ph. D, “The new Church-State alliance, aiming for the cultivated dependence of the masses, felt threatened by those who believed in rebirth because such Christians tended to be self-reliant, free-thinking individuals whose subservience could not be guaranteed.”

In 553 A.D., the Fifth Ecumenical Council condemned Origen’s theories as heresy (the root definition meaning “able to choose”).  Emperor Justinian formally denounced the concept of rebirth in no uncertain terms:

If anyone assert the fabulous pre-existence of souls and shall assert the monstrous restoration which follows from it: let him be anathema

Wow–let him be anathema– as in a “person or thing accursed or consigned to damnation or destruction.” 

 Zealous church leaders followed up that dictate by slaughtering a half million reincarnation-believing Cathars in Southern France during the 1200’s. Not satisfied with that carnage, the Inquisition was born.

Carol Bowman sums up the legacy of such repression in Children’s Past Lives thus:

The murderous efficiency of the Inquisition proved effective. The persecution by the institutional Church has scarred our collective psyche, and it has surrounded us with an invisible fence dividing what is safe from what is dangerous to believe. Since then, people who harbor forbidden ideas have learned to keep their thoughts to themselves. Our cultural memory still carries the fear of reprisal for publicly associating with any occult practices, the use of psychic powers or a belief in reincarnation.

Consequently, believers in reincarnation were effectively wiped out or muzzled. In time, the masses of the West generally forgot about it. The day-to-day struggle to survive and the poor education of the eras erased reincarnation concept from cultural memory. “

I’m happy to be living in a modern culture where my ideas can be expressed without fear of torture and death by church and government officials. Indeed, the content of the soon-to-be-released Supernal Adventures would have had me burning at a stake in a earlier era.

If you haven’t read, Ever-Flowing Streams, I invite you to check it out, in its current incarnation. I hope it will intrigue you to find out what happened next in Supernal Adventures–coming soon!

Tapping400

Available in the Kindle Store at Amazon and paperback at Lulu.com

 

 

It Will All Make Sense When You’re Dead, etc.

 

Book Reviews by Dana Taylor

If you’re interested in exploring the realm of spirit communication, It Will All Make Sense When You’re Dead by psychic medium Priscilla Keresey is a good place to begin.

In a matter-of-fact tone, she explains how she developed as a medium and many of the things she has learned. While she offers some examples of client communications with loved ones, she also does of good job of presenting how spirit communicators function. From exploring the various “clairs”—clairvoyant, clairsentient, clairaudient—to explaining common symbols utilized by mediums, she takes a lot of the mystery out of the process. Like many other things, spirit communication begins with a talent and grows into a skill through practice and application.

She also answers commonly asked questions and demonstrates how communication with spirit people can offer healing to those on the earthly realm. Far from being a book of ghost tales, this is a handbook for spirit communication and sheds light on the interplay between dimensions of realities.

Definitely for the Supernal Adventurer!

Amazon

Finding Home by Melanie Rose

This novel turned out to be a real surprise. I picked it up at the library and I’m not exactly sure why (unless my “team” picked it for me). Anyway, it turned out to be a very interesting blend of mystery with past-life recall thrown into the mix.

The story begins with a woman driving into a storm and getting lost on a country road. The car slides into a tree and the woman attempts to walk out. She soon faints and is picked up by a man and carried to a nearby country cottage. She awakens not knowing who she is, but everything feels  strangely familiar.  The story develops with many well-drawn characters, a sick little girl, her father, the housekeeper and her psychiatrist brother, the farmer and his family up the road. The woman, who takes on the name “Kate,” agrees to be hypnotized in hopes of remembering her identity. Instead, she recalls a life as “Kitty” from the late 1800’s. Increasingly, the past seems to be affecting the present. The author does a good job of tying all the story lines together.

Reincarnation, mystery, a dash of romance—what more could any Supernal reader want?

Amazon

Happy Reading—

Dana Taylor

 

The Quantum Case for Reincarnation

Lois J. Wetzel

Lois J. Wetzel

Lois J. Wetzel is a mystic and visionary thinker. She is able to communicate with the Guardians of  the Akashic Records and offers clients life-readings to help them in their present lives. Her latest book, Reincarnation: Past Lives and the Akashic Records is fascinating. At the end of the book, she added an Addendum that ties in some concepts of quantum physics to reincarnation. I asked Lois’ permission to post it here. This is for those of you who “get” it!

Reality is too complex to be trapped by a measurement, according to Dr. Deepak Chopra. In my opinion this pervasive yet foolish notion is the trouble with empiricism; the idea that the truth of what is real can be determined by a set of rules created by humans. This misconception keeps us from living in the real world. Empiricism, the currently accepted scientific method, relies almost solely upon measurement. But reality is just not that simple—as Chopra has said. Human beings are in no position to dictate what features “reality.” Reality is whatever it is. Our notion of how to determine what is real and true—that is what must change. It must change in order to embrace what reality is, not what we think it should be.     

We now know due to advances in quantum physics and mechanics over the last century that our physical universe is far more complicated than was previously believed. These advances convince many that we humans are on the edge of proving that each of us has a consciousness which transcends physical form. Or perhaps we are about to discover there is a supreme consciousness which transcends and underlies all reality, and we are part of that consciousness. Once that is firmly established and understood by a critical mass of us everything will change. A piece of that change will be that it will be finally clear to even the greatest skeptics that past lives are clearly likely within the infinite field of possibilities in which we exist.     

Indeed, the odds are great that the proof of most of what we refer to as psychic phenomena flows from that conclusion about transcendent consciousness.      I have long held that consciousness is all there is. Consciousness creates everything out of the infinite waves of probability floating somewhere in the unmanifest field.    

I first learned about the famous “double-slit experiment” back in the 1980s–the experimenters’ conclusion was that light could behave as either a particle or a wave. Which light “decided” to be was completely dependent upon its being measured. Until it was measured or observed, it was neither a particle nor a wave, just a possibility. This decision light was making was referred to as the “observer effect.” Back then the scientific measurement was considered the important event or deciding factor.     

I am relieved to report that in the ensuing thirty years more experiments have been done. It is now known that not only light, but electrons behave the same way in this experiment. Electrons are bits of matter. With further experimentation it has been found that molecules and atoms behave like waves of probability as well. This means that particles of matter do not decide when, where and how they are going to show up in the physical world until they also are observed. They do not exist as anything but a probability until a consciousness interacts with them.     

Observation being so important, perhaps it needs to be defined. Observation and measurement are the same thing.  Measurement requires some kind of measuring device or tool. One very important distinction about the measuring device is that it includes the physicality of the human being doing the observing. The eyes, the retina on which images are registered, the optic nerve which carries that image to the brain, the physical and chemical components of the brain—all these are as much bits of the measuring instrument as any metal, glass, plastic or wooden objects that might be used for measuring purposes.     

If the brain is simply an instrument, then who or what is doing the observing? It must be something outside or apart from the brain. Clearly, it has to be the consciousness since that is all that is left. In other words, when observation is broken down to its core component all that is left is consciousness—or awareness. In the end, all there is left to do the observing, and hence the creating of reality, is consciousness.      Studies have shown that something interesting happens when we decide to take an action like picking up a writing tool, for example. The hand moves in the direction of the tool a fraction of a second before the changes in the brain which signal that a decision has been made have occurred. Yes, the hand moves before the brain thinks about picking up the tool. Clearly the hand, and doubtless other parts of the body, can receive signals from consciousness as well or better than the brain.      The brain is therefore not where the decision is made. The brain is merely a receiver. The mind, or consciousness, is where the decision is made. Quantum physicist Nassim Haramein has said that looking for consciousness inside the brain is like looking for the announcer inside the radio.     

To further support the existence of a separate consciousness it is important to note certain facts. People who have died and been revived almost always report either standing outside of or floating above their own bodies. They can recount accurately what others at the scene were doing or saying after they died. To test this, certain hospitals even place written notes atop upper cabinets in operating rooms so that someone floating on the ceiling can read these notes and report back what was written there if asked later—assuming they return to life. And yes, some people do return to life and report what was written on top of the cabinets.   Consider that the people’s brains were still inside their bodies during the time they were outside those same bodies observing themselves and their surroundings. Their consciousness was not, though. Their sense of themselves, the part that observes—the part that sees and hears–was outside the body. It therefore seems clear we are not our bodies, nor our brains. What we are is a deathless consciousness which can leave and re-enter our bodies and still be conscious of what was going on as though the body were not necessary.

It follows logically that this consciousness can enter a new body prior to the time of its birth, and leave again at death. So why could we not do that more than once? Why should we assume that this awareness of ourselves cannot or would not enter a new body several times over a long span of time if the conditions were agreeable? Why would we settle for only one lifetime? There is a mounting body of evidence supporting the belief that most of the people on the planet have held for countless thousands of generations. We reincarnate.

Find Reincarnation: Past Lives and the Akashic Record at Amazon

Past-Life Regression on a Hardwood Floor

UPDATE September 2014:

Mira Kelley now has a book out, which is on my TBR list. Hay House is very selective about their authors. If you’re intrigued by past lives, check out Ms. Kelley. Below is my impression of her from the workshop I attended last year.

Beyond Past Lives: What Parallel Realities Can Teach Us About Relationships, Healing and Transformation by Mira Kelley

 

Last fall I saw a facebook ad for a Past-Life Regression workshop in Santa Monica with Mira Kelley. I had never heard of her, but with a quick click, I read her website and watched a couple of YouTube clips about her. She has risen to fame via endorsements by the New Age heavy-hitter, Wayne Dyer, no less. Since Santa Monica is a only a few freeways to the west, I decided to pony up the price of admission and go check out Ms. Kelley for myself.

The session took place at a yoga studio. Ms. Kelley sat on a cushion on a platform and the rest of us staked out a place on a hard, shiny wooden floor for FIVE hours with only a thin mat and pillow to keep us comfortable. I must say, I did fairly well for a woman who remembers the day that Kennedy was shot. Mira first told us her personal story on the path to making past life therapy her vocation. You can hear all the details for yourself at her website, MIRA KELLEY.

Mira Kelley mirakelley.comMira is a lovely woman with a lilting voice, colored with a slight Eastern European accent. Hypnosis is her game, and she has just the right tone for it. Smooth as glass, rhythmic and lulling as a rocking chair. When we finally got to the part to lay down (on that HARD floor), her sing-song sentences sent many right into another time and place. There were a few snores, as well. Afterwards, people shared fascinating tales.

Personally, I’ve had more coherent past-life recollections in the comfort of my living room, where my limbs weren’t losing circulation, using meditation techniques and linking to the Akashic Records. Still, Mira is a compelling personality and I’m glad I had the opportunity to spend the hours in her presence.

Kelley is part of a growing contingent of educated, thinking people taking reincarnation seriously. They work with clients on current life issues by exploring the influences of previous lives. If you’ve read my story in EVER-FLOWING STREAMS: TAPPING INTO HEALING ENERGY, you know that my world view changed radically when a past-life connection was revealed to me by a Reiki therapist. My life was changed and healed on many levels. It took me several years to come to terms with all the ramifications of that connection.

Mira has posted the one hour documentary IN ANOTHER LIFE on her website. It is the best film I have seen highlighting the pioneers of Western study on reincarnation, Dr. Ian Stevenson (Children Who Remember Previous Lives) and Carol Bowman (Children’s Past Lives). There are many other people interviewed who deal with past life therapy on a daily basis. If you want to spend a fascinating hour, watch IN ANOTHER LIFE:REINCARNATION IN AMERICA

IN ANOTHER LIFE: REINCARNATION IN AMERICA

Past-Life Therapy is a Thing

Part Three in a series on Past Lives

Science and psychology is now taking a fresh look at the concept of reincarnation and how it may influence our lives. Two doctors, their work, and books have played a large role in the developing field of past life therapy. The books below are now considered “classics” and make for fascinating reading. They may shift your paradigms!

Many Lives, Many Masters by

Brian L. Weiss, M.D.

As a traditional psychotherapist, Dr. Brian Weiss was astonished and skeptical when one of his patients began recalling past-life traumas that seemed to hold the key to her recurring nightmares and anxiety attacks. His skepticism was eroded, however, when she began to channel messages from the “space between lives,” which contained remarkable revelations about Dr. Weiss’ family and his dead son. Using past-life therapy, he was able to cure the patient and embark on a new, more meaningful phase of his own career.

Journey of Souls and Destiny of Souls by

Michael Newton, Ph.D

Journey of Souls and Destiny of Souls by Michael Newton, Ph.D., contains interviews given by people
under hypnosis discussing their experiences between lives on
earth.  Dr. Newton holds a doctorate in counseling and is a master
hypnotherapist. This book is based on his groundbreaking research into the
afterlife.
Subjects explored:
– Your purpose on Earth
–  Soul mates
– How spirits connect with and comfort the living
– Spirit guides
– The Council of Elders that interviews us between lives
– Why people choose a certain body to incarnate into
– What souls do between lives
All of these books make for fascinating reading!

Why are we frightened of reincarnation?

Ever-Flowing Streams: Tapping into Healing Energy

Chapter 9

Reincarnation

This excerpt is Part II in a series on reincarnation:

I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have changed several times since then.–Alice in Wonderland

Born Again?

Great minds and mystics have grappled with the theory of reincarnation for eons. The modern Christian church dismisses the concept. The party line is that we are born once; we have the option of accepting Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior for our ticket to heaven; if we don’t, we are condemned to hell. This interpretation of scripture promotes church membership quite effectively.

But looking historically and globally, I found that reincarnation has been embraced by cultures far and wide. Even the Bible retains passages that allude to it. Besides the reference above from Matthew naming John the Baptist and Elijah as the same soul, Jesus seemed to convey the concept in several references:

John 8:58–Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.

Luke 9:18-20–“Who do the people say that I am?” And they answered, “John the Baptist; but others say Elijah; and others, that one of the old prophets has risen.”

John 9:2—As he went along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”

If you take the above passages at face value, it appears there was a cultural acceptance of the idea that souls return to the earthly plane. Clearly, the people of the time exhibited a belief in reincarnation if they conjectured Jesus might be the returning spirits of Elijah or an Old Testament prophet.

Also implied in the last quotation is an understanding of karma, the cosmic law of cause and effect. Who sinned, this man or his parents that he was born blind? The question indicates a belief that a child born blind could be the result of previous misdeeds.

Other scriptures point to a karmic philosophy:

Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap-Galatians 6:7

Do unto others what you would have them do to you—Matthew 7:12

All who draw the sword will die by the sword—Matthew 26:52

Theologians have argued these passages for two thousand years. One of the earliest and most respected was Origen of Alexandria who lived from 185-254 A.D. According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, he believed in the “pre-existence and fall of souls; multiple ages and transmigration of souls; and the eventual restoration of all souls to a state of dynamic perfection in proximity to the godhead.” Quite the metaphysician, Origen. He devoted his life to teaching and writing his Christian beliefs until the Roman Emperor of the day ordered a purging of the followers of Christ. Origen was martyred in Tyre.

The debate continued for another two hundred years until the church grew into a political institution. According to Life Between Life by Joel L. Whitton, Ph. D, “The new Church-State alliance, aiming for the cultivated dependence of the masses, felt threatened by those who believed in rebirth because such Christians tended to be self-reliant, free-thinking individuals whose subservience could not be guaranteed.”

In 553 A.D., the Fifth Ecumenical Council condemned Origen’s theories as heresy (the root definition meaning “able to choose”).  Emperor Justinian formally denounced the concept of rebirth in no uncertain terms:

If anyone assert the fabulous pre-existence of souls and shall assert the monstrous restoration which follows from it: let him be anathema

Wow–let him be anathema– as in a “person or thing accursed or consigned to damnation or destruction.” [1]

Zealous church leaders followed up that dictate by slaughtering a half million reincarnation-believing Cathars in Southern France during the 1200’s. Not satisfied with that carnage, the Inquisition was born.

Carol Bowman sums up the legacy of such repression in Children’s Past Lives thus:

The murderous efficiency of the Inquisition proved effective. The persecution by the institutional Church has scarred our collective psyche, and it has surrounded us with an invisible fence dividing what is safe from what is dangerous to believe. Since then, people who harbor forbidden ideas have learned to keep their thoughts to themselves. Our cultural memory still carries the fear of reprisal for publicly associating with any occult practices, the use of psychic powers or a belief in reincarnation.

Consequently, believers in reincarnation were effectively wiped out or muzzled. In time, the masses of the West generally forgot about it. The day-to-day struggle to survive and the poor education of the eras erased reincarnation concept from cultural memory.

History marched on—the Renaissance, the split of church by the Reformation, and the Industrial Revolution transformed the West, but reincarnation did not figure into the world-view paradigm. And maybe that was a good thing.

End of excerpt

All of Chapter 9 is available to read at Scribd.com

Tapping400Ever-Flowing Streams: Tapping into Healing Energy is available at:

Ebook Amazon.com

Paperback  Lulu.com 

© 2010 by Dana Taylor
All rights reserved